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, relations between the united states and cuba become much more amicable, or relations are restored, i would like to see this to be considered as a way in which guantanamo could be used. because earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, this is a very busy seismic area, the caribbean. there are disasters that occur throughout the region almost every year. okay. i called this talk sort of my boys of discovery. i'll tell you how this became a research topic of mine, because when i first decided to write about guantanamo, it was 2003, and there was practically nothing written about the history of guantanamo. and at that time and had not achieved the infamous reputation that it has subsequently acquired as an interrogation and detention center for suspected international terrorists are well, i had written the paper about the good neighbor policy that i want to get published, and it mention guantanamo in passing. and one of the outside readers who hated my essay, asked rhetorically, how would mr. schwab deal about it if cuba had a major military base on u.s. soil? well, the notion of coors seemed preposte
changed. khrushchev came to united states, and nikita khrushchev was my father and i am sergei khrushchev. and many interesting things there. political discussion. it was very serious talk, but also many funny things. and peter found all those funny things that he pulled them together in this book, showing how we can present the political person in the contemporary way you.and i'm trying to think at t time what i feel. and i was with my father on this trip. and for us, it was like -- for the christopher columbus discovery of america. and we discovered america for ourselves. we knew about america, but what we knew, america very different. we knew something that we learn from the 19th century america. and then this new world and we tried to find out how books, i found this book very interesting, but i just wanted detail of this book of the story, but from that aside, my first wish, was what you wrote this book. 50 years ago, visit from one leader of one country to the united states. i think there may be other leaders came here. sometimes khrushchev was eccentric. and president yeltsin was m
's interesting. the bank of the united states is in some ways not the federal reserve. they don't have a currency but they're more powerful than the federal reserve today. it was a private in part privately owned stock was quite valuable. basically they controlled the money supply because they lend money to the state banks which were issued a lot of currency and the interesting thing is the bank of the united states was hiring senators, congressmen, senators to be there to represent and give speeches on their behalf. >> host: heaven forbid. >> guest: it is actually sitting members of congress it is the power of the bank had although i think a lot of economists think the bank did a good job because of its chairman nicholas biddle, the fellow from philadelphia who did a very good job but jackson hated elite is and what he saw as the corruption of the bank. >> host: and then congress passed a small probing and feed it -- vetoed it. >> guest: it's very interesting. until jackson, president hadn't vetoed many bills but they thought he could only use it for on a constitutional laws of the president of
of the united states of america certainly is very sympathetic to the marxism and communism and he is going to suffer because of that. but for these extraordinary and provides a different genealogy of black power. people like william worthy, richardson who was the activist from cambridge maryland who really was called the leedy general of the civil rights movement who waged an unprecedented struggle in cambridge maryland and 63 and 64 to help desegregate the city, met with attorney general robert f. kennedy to sign a peace accord in the early 1960's but also goes to malcolm x's nov grassroots leadership conference in detroit where malcolm delivers his famous message to the grassroots where he lays out a secular vision of domestic national but also international global political revolution. >> host: you read malcolm x was nothing less than a civil rights era's invisible man. >> absolutely. in the terms of the way which historians view malcolm x, malcolm isn't part of that heroic work of the civil rights movement. he usually only pops up are not 1963, 64 and serves as a foil to dr. king. he's
-rights organizer in the deep south. born in trinidad in 1941. emigres to the united states two weeks before his 11th birthday 1952. lives in the bronx. one of the only african-american students that test into the bronx science high school that is one of the most prestigious high schools. even as a high school student come he is an activist. 1960 he unrolls howard university and joins the nonviolent action group which is a affiliate of snic and becomes a free director and is arrested in mississippi and spent 49 days in the worst prison farm and he celebrates his 20th birthday in prison with civil-rights activity that is the first-ever 27 arrest but what is really important about stokely carmichael that i tried to convey a is carmichael is one of the few americans domestically who actually pleads for democracy. undergoing physical terror and violence at the hands of hate to groups and domestic terrorist like the mississippi delta and in cambridge merrill lynch to promote poaching rights in sitters and share price for all african-americans. >> host: we're getting close to the break time and i want to
is born in trinidad. emigres he immigrates to the united states two weeks before his 11th birthday in 1952. he lives in the bronx. he is one of the only african-american students who tests in to the high school in 1956. that is one of the most prestigious high schools in your city. even as the high schools in he is an activist. by 1963 enrolls in howard university . and really stokely carmichael becomes a freedom rider and is arrested in mississippi. he really celebrates his 20th birthday in prison for civil-rights activity. that is going to be the first of 27 arrests between 1961 and 1966. what is really important about stokely carmichael that i tried to convey in this book is that carmichael is one of the few americans domestically during the 1960's who actually believes would democracy. but i mean by that is undergoes physical peril and violence as the hands of hate groups and really domestic terrorists in places like the mississippi delta, in alabama, in cambridge, maryland, in washington, d.c. to promote voting rights and citizenship rights for all african-americans. >> host: i want t
we. >> host: this is what is so disturbing about what you just described. in the united states in the year 2009, in the 21st century that we have these kinds of intimidation tactics and strong-arm tactics to silence people with legitimate points of view. again nobody is going on the air yelling fire in a crowded theater. we are simply expressing a legitimate political point of view and what we have now are the stock police said, from milak, the thought police, he mentioned orwellian. that is exactly what it is where you feel you have to waferboard and if you come out with a joke-- those of us to do three hours on the air every day five days a week, sometimes six days a week, you find yourself weighing every word, maybe holding ireton because you are afraid that the thought police might come at you oris you say put it in some form of perverse content, ms. characterize it, plastered all over the place and you will lose revenue or your radio stations might get hurt. >> guest: i have given up on that. i don't care anymore. i just state what i feel and i have been attacked over so m
our sons are back. they are back from the united states and their long extended visit and they are back home and we get that kind of love and it is hard to explain, like a love that a mother has for their son and the whole country has it for us. >> our every day life, it doesn't matter who we are and where you are from and what you v you can all do little things to impact somebody's life. >> through football, wally and izzi can make an impact on countless fans but during the trip, there was one child who made a huge impact on them. a 4-year-old lady named shakier asman. her smile and behind that was a sick girl in desperate need of health. she was born with a life threatening defect, a whole in her heart. as words spread about her condition an organization called the heart gift foundation was is able help but there was a page snag. airfare to the united states was not part of the funding. >> i was like it can't be happen tog this girl. so full of life, even when i wrote a letter, i said she is full a life. i started talking to people and fortunately, i met this council
created the bank of the united states which was a forerunner. he had achieved his fame but his enemies led by thomas jefferson broke this story of his adultery and he was in business with the woman and he was slipping tips on the stock market so hamilton in order to prove he was a man of integrity as a financier and secretary of treasury he took the whole story of his adultery down to every letter that the exchanged and was 95 pages long, this letter was and people laughed at him. looked like he was totally finished but i can't say whether you, will you for the book, barbara, but wait until you people who have read the book, cross t's, it is an amazing surprise and this is one of the, said the book is full of surprises. and this was an enormous surprise to me. as hamilton is a riveting and his publishing and so forth into the house in new york comes a silver service from washington with a letter saying i just want to let you know that might regard for you remains unchanged and i still think you are a man of integrity. >> host: and they had a falling out, too to read this was an amazing --
of "a people's history of sports in the united states." >> host: welcome to "after words." i'm dave zirin, i'm the sports editor for the nation magazine, and i'm absolutely thrilled to be interviewing a man who has written a tremendous biography about the greatest pound-for-pound boxer of the 20th century. that boxer's name is walker smith jr. better known as sugar ray robinson, and the author is wil haygood. how you doing, sir? >> guest: i'm good. great to be here. >> host: it's good to have you. >> guest: i really do think this book is a tremendous ak450e6789, so congratulations right away. >> guest: thank you very much. thank you. >> host: you are not a sports biographer by trade. >> guest: right. >> host: why did you decide to spend five years of your life writing about sugar ray robinson? >> guest: well, i had written two previous biographies, one of adam clayton powell and the other the entertainer, sammy davis jr. so i started thinking, if i could find another subject that interested me, i'd have a trilogy. three major biographies. and i wanted adam powell, of course, a polit
has been as big a purveyor of violence as the united states. he says america, you have a lot of repenting to do. now king always came out of that and showed the way to the better way. so, there are certain similarities in the prophetic anchor at injustice when king was earmarks mississippi building up to the poor people's march and he sees these little black children the stomachs reading a couple pieces of fruit and goes back to the motel with tears in his life eis and ralph albert -- ralf elbra cathy sees king line in the dead he says ralph, i knew there was under but he didn't know it was like that and in that per goebel in black churches and national cathedral king says god doesn't like the way his children are being treated. and he makes america into the parable of mass arrests and says the rich man did not go to hell because he was rich but because he wouldn't recognize the poor man. so there was this angry condemnatory part of king. jeremiah. jeremiah. there is a reason for that. i think there are differences between king and wright but we have sanitized king and lost t
of the united states, which was a forerunner. he had achieved his fame, but his enemies, led by thomas jefferson broke the story of adultery. but they claim that he was also in business with the woman's husband and he was flipping him tips on the stock market and so hamilton in order to prove that he was still a man of integrity as a financier and a secretary of treasury, he told the whole story of his adultery down to every letter. it was 95 pages long this letter was. and people just laughed. it looked like he was totally finished. but -- i can't say -- you've read the book probably. wait until the people who haven't come across this. it's an amazing surprise and this is one, as i said, the book is full of surprises. this was an enormous surprise to me. as hamilton is arriving in his public shame, in "new york times" is silver service from washington with a letter saying that i just want you to let you know that my regard for you remains unchanged area and he was basically saying i still think you're a preacher at and a man of integrity. >> host: they had a falling out, too. >> guest: in the c
of the united states which was a forerunner. he had achieved his fame but his enemies led by thomas jefferson broke this story of his adultery but they claim he was also in business with a woman's husband and was slipping tips on the stock market and so hamilton in order to prove that he was still a man of integrity as a financier and secretary of the treasury he told the whole story of his adultery down to every letter the exchange and so forth and there was 95 pages long, this letter and people just laughed at him. it looked like he was totally finished. but i can't say whether he is. you've read the book, barbara but we don't know people have read the book come across this. it is an amazing surprise and this was one of the as i said the book is full of surprises and this was an enormous surprise to me as hamilton is a riding in this public shame and so forth into his house in new york comes a silver service from washington with a letter saying i just wanted you know that my regard for you remains unchanged and he basically said i still think you are a petri and man of integrity. >> host: a
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13